Examples Of Analysis In Essays

You’ve been staring at your blank computer screen for what feels like hours, trying to figure out how to start your analytical essay. You try to choose between writing the introduction first or getting right into the meat of it. But somehow, it seems too difficult to do either.

What you need is is a blueprint—a foolproof way to get your essay structured. Then all you have to do is fill in the blanks.

By Anonymous [Public domain], via Wikimedia Commons

Don’t worry—consider me your architect. I’m here to give you an analytical essay outline that’ll make writing the final draft (relatively) painless.

What an Analytical Essay Is—And What It Isn’t

Before we get to the good stuff, you should know exactly what an analytical essay is. Your middle school and high school teachers probably told you something like, “An analytical essay is writing that analyzes a text.”

Helpful, right? Um, not so much.

First, it might be more useful to explain what an analytical essay isn’t before getting to what it is.

An analytical essay isn’t a summary. Though this may seem obvious in theory, it’s more difficult in practice. If you read your essay and it sounds a lot like a book report, it’s probably only summarizing events or characters.

One way to figure out if you’re summarizing instead of analyzing is to look at your support. Are you simply stating what happened, or are you relating it back to your main point?

Okay, so what is an analytical essay, exactly?

Usually, it’s writing that has a more narrowed focus than a summary. Analytical essays usually concentrate on how the book or poem was written—for example, how certain themes present themselves in the story, or how the use of metaphor brings a certain meaning to a poem.

In short, this type of essay requires you to look at the smaller parts of the work to help shed light on the larger picture.

An example of a prompt—and the example I’m going to use for the rest of this post—could be something like: Analyze the theme of sacrifice in the Harry Potter series. (Note: there might be some spoilers, but I figured everyone who was planning on reading the books has done so already—or at least has seen the movies.)

One Way To Form Your Analytical Essay Outline

There are quite a few ways to organize your analytical essay, but no matter how you choose to write it, your essay should always have three main parts:

  1. Introduction
  2. Body
  3. Conclusion

I’ll get into the nitty-gritty of this soon, but for all you visual learners, here is a nice representation of all the components that make a great analytical essay outline.

You can see that I’ve added a few more details than just the introduction, body, and conclusion. But hold your horses—we’re getting to those parts right now.

Introduction of Your Analytical Essay Outline

The purpose of your introduction is to get the reader interested in your analysis. The introduction should include at least three things—a hook, your thesis statement, and a sentence or two describing how you intend to prove your thesis statement.

1. You gotta hook ‘em from the start. The first part of your introduction should draw the reader in. This is called the hook.

The hook should be interesting or surprising. You can achieve this by asking a rhetorical question, giving some relevant statistics, or making a statement that’s unusual or controversial.

For my Harry Potter example, I might say, “Since the publication of the first book in the Harry Potter series, Harry Potter and the Philosopher’s Stone, some Christian groups have attacked the books for promoting witchcraft. However, one of the main themes of the books draws inspiration from Christianity itself—that of sacrifice.”

Okay, so that’s two sentences. But it’s got a little bit of controversy and relates to what the rest of the essay will discuss.

2. Get to the good stuff—write a killer thesis statement. Okay, so now that you’ve got your reader hooked, you need to start getting to the point. This is where the thesis statement comes in.

My thesis might be, “The theme of sacrifice is prevalent throughout the series and is embodied as sacrifice for the greater good, sacrifice for an ultimate gain, and sacrifice to keep a promise.”

3. It’s time to back up your thesis. Let the reader know how you’re going to prove your claim.

For my example, I would let the reader know that I intend to analyze the instances of Harry’s “death,” Voldemort’s sacrifice of his soul in exchange for immortality, and how Snape sacrifices in order to honor a promise made to Lily Potter.

These points will be the building blocks of the body paragraphs.

Body of Your Analytical Essay Outline

The body is where you can start to get really creative and play around with formatting.

In the flowchart, there are three body paragraphs. But that’s because I was trained in the 5-paragraph outline. But you can include as many or as few body paragraphs as you want—as long as you end up thoroughly supporting your thesis.

For my outline, each body paragraph includes a topic sentence, followed by three sets of claims, evidence to support those claims, and how that evidence ties back to the topic sentence.

Again, three is not necessarily a magic number here. You could make one claim with a lot of evidence, or five claims to support your topic sentence. But let’s get into it, shall we?

1. Develop a strong topic sentence. Each topic sentence in each body paragraph of your analytical essay outline should tell the reader exactly what that section is going to be about.

My first body paragraph might start with, “Harry Potter is willing to fulfill prophecy and make the ultimate sacrifice—that of his life—in order to save the rest of the wizarding world.”

2. Make your claim. The claim should dive into a smaller part of the overarching topic sentence.

The topic sentence I gave can be broken down into several smaller claims—that Harry knew that he was fulfilling prophecy, that he was actually willing to die, and that his death would be of profound significance.

3. Provide evidence from the text to back your claim. You can’t just go around making claims without any support. You can use quotes or paraphrase parts of the text to add evidence.

For evidence that Harry knew that he was fulfilling prophecy, you could cite the instance in the hall of prophecies with the quote, “and either must die at the hand of the other for neither can live while the other survives.”

4. Tie that evidence to the topic sentence. You have to make it absolutely clear why you included the evidence. If you don’t, your analytical essay runs the risk of being a summary.

For example, with the citing of the prophecy, I would tell the reader that Harry and his friends found said prophecy and figured out that it had to be about him (although there are objections that it could’ve been referring to Neville, but we’ll leave that out of this example). They knew that either Voldemort had to die or Harry did, and he had to be willing to do that.

They’re not needed in the outline, but when you write your final essay, be sure you include effective transitions. This will help your essay flow.

Conclusion of Your Analytical Essay Outline

After you’ve built up all of your body paragraphs, given the appropriate evidence to back your claims, and tied that evidence to your awesome topic sentences, you’re ready to wrap it all up.

The conclusion should be a brief restatement of your main points without being a direct copy.

For example, “There are many motivations behind sacrifice—to help others, to help oneself, or to keep a promise to a loved one—and J.K. Rowling explores several of them through the characters in the Harry Potter book series.”

This, of course, does not suffice as a full conclusion. To fill it out and give the reader a sense of closure, you can relate the theme to the real world or end with a final quote from the text or the author.

Use This Downloadable Analytical Essay Outline as a Guide

Easy, right? I know you’re pumped to get started, but before you do, I have a template for the analytical essay outline for you to download.

Download the Analytical Essay Outline Template PDF

Download the Analytical Essay Outline Template (.doc)

Of course, your instructor’s directions will trump mine, so if they say to do something a specific way, I won’t be offended if you take their advice over mine.

Need more help? Check out these analytical essay examples.

And don’t forget about the Kibin editors. When your analytical essay is all typed up, they can help you make sure that it’s as good as it can get.

Now… get to it!

Psst... 98% of Kibin users report better grades! Get inspiration from over 500,000 example essays.

Great, you finished watching a movie or reading a book for university! However, before you’re free to go explore the wonders of college life, the professor decides to give you guys some work (what a nice guy). He gives out the instructions and tells you to analyze the book/movie and provide an informative argument for any topic of your choice. Obviously, it has to link back to the book/movie, but besides that the world is yours. Have no idea what you’re doing? Looks like you’ve come to the right place!


Table Of Contents



What is An Analytical Essay

The term “Analytical Essay” may sound foreign to you, but no worries, it is almost guaranteed that you have written one before! If we take a look at the definition, the term analysis means .

Therefore, an analytical essay is a piece of writing that provides an informative observation about the specific topic or idea. So let’s imagine that your topic of choice is . Obviously, writing an essay on the topic of marijuana is too general. There is so much you can talk about: from its origins in ancient times to its impact towards the war on drugs. However, the analytical essay asks you to take a small section of the entire topic, and use critical thinking to come up with some sort of argument, aka your thesis!

Topics And Ideas

There is an infinite number of different essay topics that can be analyzed. Think about any sort of fact or idea: connections can be made from anything, thus we formulate ideas and use fact to support it! In the grand scheme of things, doing jobs like this is what brought humanity from hitting rocks together for warmth to sending humans to the moon! From what we know, we can create more ideas and thus advance as a society. But enough philosophy, let’s get into the various types of analysis!

Rhetorical Analysis Essay

Just like it sounds, this is an essay where you . Imagine you are proving a fact to somebody who either can’t comprehend it or is skeptical of its authenticity! This type of analysis is based on facts and logic, so they tend to be in the fields of science and mathematics!

Examples of this can be:

  • Geometric Proofs
  • Fundamental of Physics (Newton’s Law, Theory of Relativity,...)
  • General Principle of Economics (Money makes Money)

Literary Analysis Essay

One of the most common types of analysis that college and high school students perform. After reading a specific short or any piece of literature, provide an informative analysis of a certain situation, or critically analyze a quote and its impact on the plot! This is different from rhetorical in the sense that rhetorical analysis is mostly based around logic and provable facts. A literary analysis usually goes deeper into things such as emotion and decision making of certain characters! Examples of this can be:

  • Effects of “Utopia-rescue” societies on people! Book: 1984 By George Orwell
  • Loves an effect on human decision making. Romeo and Juliet by Shakespeare
  • Conforming to societies norms: To Kill a Mockingbird by Harper Lee!

Process Analysis Essay

If we think about the definition, a process is a change from one state to another through several stages or levels. A common way to explain this change would be through an essay format. This would require you to explain its purpose, as well as explaining the transformation through a series of paragraphs. Examples of this can be:

  • Amazon's Logistics
  • The Water Cycle
  • The Cycle of Depression
  • Sleep Cycle

Character Analysis Essay

Usually used within the context of some sort of story/tale, character analysis is very similar to process analysis essay. This type of essay requires you to explain and analyze the transformation of a character from the initial point until the end. Things that should be analyzed are as follows: personality, character traits, mental reformation, etc... Examples of this can be:

  • Transformation of Huck and Jim in The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn
  • Will Hunting’s mental evolution in Good Will Hunting
  • Viktor Navorksi in The Terminal

Poetry Analysis Essay

Poetry analysis requires the writer to research the poem’s content, structure and historical significance in an explanatory style. The goal is to make the reader understand the poems overall significance and its purpose. Examples of this can be:

  • Robert Frost's The Road Not Taken
  • Edgar Allan Poe's A Dream Within a Dream
  • Emily Dickinson's There is Another Sky

Causal Analysis Essay

If you have ever dealt with an annoying child ask “WHY” a million times in a row, then you have dealt with this type of paper in real life! The causal essay requires you to answer a why question to the best of your abilities. A lot of the times, questions can’t be answered 100%. This is why the causal essay is also known as the Speculating About Causes Essay. This requires you to describe the process that occurs, following up with why you believe it occurred in this style. Examples of this can be:

  • Why do we respond physically to fear?
  • Why do we crave sugar?
  • Why do teenagers rebel against their parents and authority?
  • Why are random shootings becoming more common in the U.S.?

These are just some of the most common types of analytical essays. The variation is practically endless, but they all must follow the same type of outline.

Steps To Take Before Writing

Unless essay writing comes to you naturally, preparation is key in writing that well-rounded and high-quality paper. So before you start typing up your masterpiece, 5 steps should be taken:

  • Brainstorm and Decide on a Topic;
  • Craft A Captivating Title;
  • Create a strong Thesis;
  • Find Supporting Evidence;
  • Create an Outline.

Brainstorm and Decide on a Topic:

  • Step 1 requires you to figure out what you’re going to be writing about (obviously). Sometimes in the advance, you are given some options to pick from. You could have already been told what type of analytical essay you have to write, or you could have just been thrown into the improvisation pool. Regardless it’s important to scope in to your topic.
  • When you get right down to it, the topic that you decide to write about should match one that either interests you or it should be one that you fully understand. It would be idiotic to pick a topic that you struggle to fully comprehend or one that puts you to sleep. It’s fairly important to write about something that you at least slightly enjoy!

Craft A Captivating Title

  • As soon as your title is the first thing your reader will see try to make it as attractive as possible. After reading it, readers will decide, does it worth to read the rest or not.

Create A Strong Thesis

  • The goal of the analytical essay is to prove a certain point that the writer is trying to make. From the information that has been gathered, the writer needs to link things together and create a certain decision. This decision is called a thesis, and it’s an argument that is created to prove an assumption created by the writer, using facts and research. For certain topics, it's important to introduce the outside forces that contributed to the creation of your thesis. For example, if you are talking about historical events, it's important to introduce the external factors that led to your thesis. If we are talking about Scientific Research, then considering the scientific method is a necessity.
  • The thesis shouldn't be a simple yes or no question with an answer. It should be a complex point that has many interconnected factors. The thesis should be controversial and require tons of research to come up with a respectable statement. Lastly, the thesis should be a high impact statement that strongly effects the topic of choice.

Find Supporting Evidence

  • You won't be able to sway anybody with your thesis statement unless it's backed by something. This is why all good statements need research and analysis. It's important to gather information that supports your argument. Depending on the type of essay, it won’t necessarily be straightforward information.
  • If we are talking about a historical topic or some sort of scientific fact, then your supporting evidence will evidently be facts taken from previous findings. However, if you are writing a literary analysis essay, then most likely your evidence will be quotes from the story. This type of evidence requires analysis and assumptions in regards towards how the reader should interpret the line.

Create An Outline

Organizing the structure of the essay is very important and makes the entire writing process easier. A number of paragraphs in the paper carries little to no importance. Paper outline will vary based on the topic of discussion and the thesis statement that is created. Regardless, the Intro-Body(s)-Conclusion style is a staple in any Analytical Essay.

Proper Outline

Introduction

The introduction usually starts out with some sort of background information. Sometimes using a hook statement can be effective, but it is not required. There is no specific style for the introduction, but background information is the most common method of approach. You should provide information that is relevant to your thesis. This information should start out broad and narrow down in relevance towards the thesis. The structure will look something like this.

  • Hook Statement/ Brief Introductory Point
  • Background Info (Narrowed)
  • Transition sentence
  • Thesis Statement

Body Paragraphs

The main goal of the body paragraphs is to fully prove the thesis statement. Each individual paragraph should focus on a certain aspect of the thesis. For example, if the thesis is centered around the evolution of Will Hunting, then the body paragraphs should each hold their own point. One body paragraph focuses on his diminishing self-guilt, and a second could talk about the ever increasing support system and its impact on his mentality. The body paragraphs should maintain proper structure:

  • Topic Sentence: Introduce the main point of the body paragraph in one straightforward and effective sentence.
  • Analysis: Analyze your supporting evidence and explain how the evidence supports your thesis. This part should take 1 or 2 sentences and is arguably the most important part of the entire essay. The reader will see your understanding of the topic based on what you write within these 2 sentences. Make sure it`s creative and impactful, but also keep it original!
  • Evidence: No analysis is complete without supporting evidence. This is where you show how you handled the research. The analysis is created from the supporting evidence that you find, so they should always go hand in hand. Make sure that these 2 parts link together in a straightforward manner.
  • Concluding Sentence: After providing a well thought out analysis and adding in evidence, the paragraph should always add a concluding sentence. Restate to the reader your analysis and its significance to the point in hand.

After reading a single body paragraph, the viewer should have clearly understood the argument or point you were trying to prove. If he had some trouble painting himself a picture or understanding your logic, then one or more parts of your body paragraph may have some mistakes.

It's important to mention that having numerous body paragraphs isn’t that important. Depending on the topic, each essay will vary based on the depth of the thesis. Quality over quantity goes a long way here.

Conclusion

The conclusion plays a vital role in the sense that it ties up the entire essay.
First things first, you should start out by restating your thesis statement. The significance of this is to clearly exemplify to your viewer that you have fully proven the thesis and to summarize the steps you took in order to do so. To end the entire essay, it’s necessary to create an overall concluding statement. This can be either what you have learned from writing the essay or what the audience should take away from your work. The structure should look like this:

  • Rephrase the Thesis statement
  • Summarize key points
  • Overall Concluding Statement

General Tips and Advice

Proofread

After writing the entire essay, take a short break and then reread it from front to back. The chances are that you will find parts of the paper which are filled with mistakes or parts that need clarity. Regardless of what the issues are, make sure the essay has clarity before handing in completed work.
You can also get academic writing help from out company in case You need some third-party opinion.

Get a Second Pair of Eyes

Just because the essay made sense to you, doesn’t mean that everyone else will receive it with the same level of understanding. Online essay writer or peer edits help to give the essay a wider range of clarity.

Make sure the thesis fits your argument points

Your paper will be highly judged based on how well you proved your thesis. That’s why it’s important to edit your thesis based on the type of arguments you provided. If your explanations don’t perfectly suit the thesis statement you crafted, then adjust it accordingly.

Analytical Essay Sample

Essay Writing Advice From Our Professional Team

Professor Jay, from EssayPro

An analytical essay is not explained in many writing textbooks. In essay writing, an analysis is the fundamental element of synthesis essays, summary essays, reflective essays, and most types of college papers. Without knowing how to analyze articles or walk your reader through a process properly, you will not be able to produce lab reports or literature papers. In an essay like this, something to stress is that analysis requires you dig deep; you can not simply summarize. You need to go beyond the who, what, where, and when, and instead answer questions of how and why.

My personal advice is to begin with a set of questions: How is this written? Who is the audience? And Is it effectively written for that audience? After answering these, it will be much easier to answer how exactly the author wrote the piece and elaborate further on why the piece was written. While writing, make sure to annotate and take notes. Keep your eye on the author’s tone and diction. This skill is incredibly important and will follow you all through middle school, high school, college, and then into life itself.

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