Chicago Manual Of Style Bibliography Template For Websites

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How to reference a Website using the Chicago Manual of Style

The most basic entry for a website consists of the author name(s), page title, website title, web address, and date accessed.

Last Name, First Name. “Page Title.” Website Title. Web Address (retrieved Date Accessed).

Smith, John. “Obama inaugurated as President.” CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).

The first author’s name should be reversed, with a comma being placed after the last name and a period after the first name (or any middle name). Titles and affiliations associated with the author should be omitted. A suffix, such as a roman numeral or Jr./Sr., should appear after the author’s given name, preceded by a comma.

For a page with two or more authors, list them in the order as they appear on the website. Only the first author’s name should be reversed, while the others are written in normal order. Separate author names by a comma.

Smith, John, and Jane Doe. “Obama inaugurated as President.” CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).

If no author is available, begin the citation with the website owner.

Cable News Network. “Obama inaugurated as President.” CNN.com. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).

The full page title, which is followed by a period, should be placed within quotation marks. Place the period within the quotation marks. Then include the website title, followed by a period. If the website title is not available, include the website owner in its place.

Smith, John. “Obama inaugurated as President.” Cable News Network. http://www.cnn.com/POLITICS/01/21/obama_inaugurated/index.html (accessed February 1, 2009).

Include the web address of the page. Next, place the text “accessed” and the date on which you accessed the website (written in the format of “month day, year”) in parentheses. Conclude the citation with a period after the parentheses.

For informal websites (such as home page or fan websites) or websites without formal titles, use descriptive phrases in your citation in place of page or website titles.

If the website has a print counterpart, such as the website for a newspaper, place the website title in italics.

Smith, John. “Catalonia Declares Independence from Spain.” New York Times. http://www.newyorktimes.com/POLITICS/11/21/catalonia_spain.html (accessed February 1, 2017).

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Book, one author:
Berry, Wendell.The Gift of Good Land. San Francisco: Northpoint, 1981.

Book, two to three authors:
Lynd, Robert and Helen Lynd. Middletown: A Study in American Culture. New York: Harcourt, Brace and World, 1929.

Book, four or more authors:
Hall, Jacquelyn Dowd, James Leloudis, Robert Korstad, Mary Murphy, Lu Ann Jones, and Christopher B. Daly.Like a Family: The Making of a
     Southern Cotton Mill World
. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 1987.

  • Unlike in the footnote or endnote, all author names are written in the bibliography.

Book with editor:
Del Castillo, Adelaida R., ed. Between Borders: Essays on Mexicana/Chicana History. Encino, CA: Floricanto, 1990.

Chapter in a book:
Higdon Beech, Mary. "The Domestic Realm in the Lives of Hindu Women in Calcutta." In Separate Worlds: Studies of Purdah in South Asia,
     edited by Hanna Papanek and Gail Minault, 110-38. Delhi, India: Chanakya, 1982.

  • When citing an individual chapter (including instances when you cite a direct quote from the chapter), put the page numbers of the whole chapter after the book title or editor.

E-books downloaded from library or bookseller:

Austen, Jane. Pride and Prejudice. New York: Penguin Classics, 2007. Kindle edition.

E-books consulted online:

Elliot Antokoletz, Musical Symbolism in the Operas of Debussy and Bartók (New York: Oxford University Press, 2008), doi:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780195365825.001.0001.

E-books on CD-ROM:

The Chicago Manual of Style, 15th ed. (Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 2003), CD-ROM, 1.4.

E-books of freely available older works:

Walt Whitman, Leaves of Grass (New York, 1855), 22, http://www.whitmanarchive.org/published/LG/1855/whole.html.

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